Products & Trends

Dive into the Gene Pool
In the prenatal world, genetic counseling is gaining in popularity. Moms-to-be identify chromosome abnormalities earlier than classic amniocentesis and chronic villus sampling previously allowed. The first trimester nuchal translucency test gives earlier indications of Dwon syndrome than second trimester tests. Doctors are even able to isolate genetically normal embryos for in vitro fertilization, so the genetic peace of mind comes before you make the decision to have kids.

Controversial gender selection techniques are also on the rise. MicroSort, a new “family balancing” technology can more accurately select sperm for XX or XY chromosomes than previous methods. Some techniques will only be approved if the family in question already has more children of one gender than the other, but as this becomes more popular, restrictions should relax.

Wired Babies
User-friendly mobile technology is growing at a much more rapid rate than your little tyke. Consider: Palm-sized baby monitors with infrared cameras send video of your sleeping youngster straight to your iPad, showing their temperature and the room’s humidity. Next, the iPotty is a brightly colored plastic toilet with a pedestal for your tablet meant to keep the unruly toddler occupied during crucial potty training time. (Don’t worry, a splash guard protects the screen.) And if you can’t get enough live imaging of your baby, Mobisante offers an $8,000 ultrasound monitor—because having a baby wasn’t expensive enough.

Pumping Iron
Prevailing research says the intensity of your workout makes all the difference of exercising while pregnant. The National Institutes of Health found that mild amounts of aerobic exercise won’t have a significant effect on any part of the birth, or the child in the long term. So, your twice-weekly 30-minute walk or spin should be fine (if you can adjust to the extra weight). Not true for harder workouts. If your heart rate rises above 90% of your normal levels, then blood flow to the baby can be constricted and the fetal heart rate could drop.

Dive into the Gene Pool
In the prenatal world, genetic counseling is gaining in popularity. Moms-to-be identify chromosome abnormalities earlier than classic amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling previously allowed. The first trimester nuchal translucency test gives earlier indications of Down syndrome than second trimester tests. Doctors are even able to isolate genetically normal embryos for in vitro fertilization, so the genetic peace of mind comes before you make the decision to have kids.

Controversial gender selection techniques are also on the rise. MicroSort, a new “family balancing” technology can more accurately select sperm for XX or XY chromosomes than previous methods. Some techniques will only be approved if the family in question already has more children of one gender than the other, but as this becomes more popular restrictions should relax.

Take It to the Bank
Squeamish readers, you’ve been warned: The practice of preserving blood from the umbilical cord for future medicinal usage is becoming more common. Although “cord blood banking” isn’t new, more medical professionals are favoring the preemptive method because cells from the cord can aid in the treatment of serious diseases later in life. Researchers say that for every few hundred people, one will need cord blood transplants (clinical trials are close to finding an effective method for treating cerebral palsy). Of course, cord blood cells are technically stem cells, so the decision depends on your bioethical views. But in practice, the donation is harmless for mother and child.

No Comments

You must be logged in to post a comment.